There are times when BD and I feel that keeping the Glass Houses standing is a bit like having inherited the Forth Bridge. It is in fact very rare to have a Walled Garden with almost all the Glass Houses. Some of ours have, over the years been taken down, but not in our time here. I have made it plain that if they go, we’d go too.  In the photograph below you can see someone working on the ranges of glass houses .

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In one of my first blogs I wrote that I had discovered  that Paradise means Walled Garden in Pashtun. This was a bit like the light on the road to Damascus. It suddenly became clear to me that a Walled Garden is a wonderful protected place for plants to grow. Our more recent ancestors, the Victorians, built on this heritage and enhanced it with “technology”, as in heating. This was done to further extend the seasons that the Walled Garden provides by protecting the plants from the worst of the weather.

 

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Our Glass Houses are in need of some repairs every year. The potting shed is turned into a joiner’s workshop where glass, timber and equipment spills out onto the paths. I am longing to find someone who can help us in this process. I want to replace the rotting timbers with something that doesn’t rot or rust. So one of our children, who did Industrial and Product Design at Loughborough University, has been tasked with finding this elusive material. I’ll keep you posted. In the meantime Nigel and his apprentice will be working on the treasure we have here.

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